Rackspace Builds Highly Available Cloud Using Red Hat OpenStack Platform

uptime

Rackspace is known for our expertise building highly available solutions for our customers, so it should be no surprise that we’ve been able to apply that competency to managed OpenStack solutions for both our upsteam offering and Rackspace Private Cloud powered by Red Hat. or PRC-R.

I provided some details in my previous post, about RPC-R’s reference architecture. Here, I want to drill down even more into how we worked with Red Hat to build high availability into the control plane of the RPC-R solution.

As we know, component failures will happen in a cloud environment, particularly as that cloud grows in scale. However, users still expect their OpenStack services and APIs will be always on and always available, even when servers fail. This is particularly important in a public cloud or in a private cloud where resources are being shared by multiple teams.

The starting point for architecting a highly available OpenStack cloud is the control plane. While a control plane outage would not disrupt running workloads, it would prevent users from being able to scale out or scale in in response to business demands. Accordingly, a great deal effort went into maintaining service uptime as we architected RPC-R, particularly the Red Hat OpenStack platform which is the OpenStack distribution at the core of RPC-R.

To read more about how Rackspace and Red Hat have collaborated on the best OpenStack private cloud solution, please click here to go to my article on the Rackspace blog site.

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